Air change rates and carbon dioxide concentrations in a high-rise office building

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TypeArticle
Journal titleASHRAE Transactions
ISSN0001-2505
Volume100
Issue2
Pages12511263; # of pages: 13
Subjectventilation; carbon dioxide; measurement; tracer gas; air distribution; co2-based demand control; Indoor air
AbstractThe feasibility of controlling ventilation rates using occupant-generated carbon dioxide (C02) as the control index has been examined in a large high-rise office building with a constant-volume heating, ventilating, and air-conditioning (HVAC) system. Daily C02 concentration profiles throughout the building and air change rates, using sulfurhexafluoride (SF6) as a tracer gas, were measured for several outdoor air supply rates. Of particular interest was how well the C02 concentrations measured in the centralventilation system's return air plenum represented the average C02 concentration behavior in the building as a whole. C02 concentration profiles were also measured onindividual floorspaces in the building to determine the range of variability in the concentration behavior in occupied zones. The influence of fresh air supply rates on the speed of mixing of the tracer gas (surrogate contaminant) was also examined. The practicability of using C02 as an active tracer gas to measure air change rates was also investigated. The results are discussed in the paper.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIRC-P-3234
NRC number35987
4090
NPARC number20358442
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Record identifierf6f2cf7d-0a57-4a85-946f-cd6cfe3a28c9
Record created2012-07-20
Record modified2016-05-09
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