Elastic strain determination in semiconductor epitaxial layers by HREM

DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/0968-4328(95)00020-8
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Proceedings titleMicron
Conference22nd annual meeting of the Microscopical Society of Canada
Pages521537; # of pages: 17
Subjectcumulative sum; Fourier filtering; high resolution electron microscopy; image simulations; lattice fringes; semiconductor bilayer; semiconductor superlattice; strain analysis; surface relaxation; surface roughnes
AbstractA new technique that is independent of image contrast and robust to the presence of experimental noise is presented to analyze strains from high resolution electron microscopy (HREM) lattice images. This approach involves the analysis of the cumulative sum of deviations (CUSUM) in lattice-fringe spacings from a target value. The effects of surface roughness at an interface, and surface relaxation due to transmission electron microscope (TEM) sample preparation are discussed. The CUSUM method was applied to two simulated and two experimental HREM images of semiconductor strained layer structures in [] zone axis projection. The CUSUM technique was able to accurately reproduce the strain profiles from the simulated and experimental images in all cases studied except for the component of the strain in the slip direction (exx) of an edge dislocation in a simulated image. In this case, the strain field near the core appeared hemispherical rather than lobed as expected.
Publication date
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Fuel Cell Innovation; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12339239
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Record identifierf85cf2ab-8132-4c8f-8afd-8d6879c2cd31
Record created2009-09-11
Record modified2016-05-09
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