Experiments on anisotropic and rate sensitive strain ratio and modulus of columnar-grained ice

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1115/1.3257107
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Offshore Mechanics and Arctic Engineering
Volume111
Issue4
Pages354360; # of pages: 7
Subjectice; strain; test procedures; lateral, axial strain; freshwater, sea ice; uniaxial loads; microcracking; stress, strain rate range; closed-loop controlled test system; foil gauges; displacement gauge
AbstractAnisotropic and rate sensitive characteristics of the ratio of lateral strain to axial strain in addition to the rate sensitive effective modulus for columnar-grained freshwater ice and sea ice from the Arctic, have been investigated. Tests were carried out at -20 degrees C, for conditions of no microcracking under uniaxial loads (normal to the length of the grains) in the stress rate range of 1 x 10-3 MN.m-2s- 1 to 1 x 102 MN.m-2 s-1 or an equivalent strain rate range of 1 x 10-7 s-1 to 1 x 10-2 s-1. With increase in stress rate, the ratio increased from about 0.2 to 0.3 in the plane parallel to the columns whereas it decreased from about 0.65 to 0.3 in the plane normal to the columns. A closed-loop controlled test system in association with foil gauges, mounted directly on the specimen, was used. A clipon displacement gauge was used to evaluate the accuracy of the foil gauges.
Publication date
PublisherASME
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Institute for Research in Construction
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIRC-P-1515
NRC number28748
891
NPARC number20331626
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Record identifierf8825293-95ad-4356-ba01-c2bcbd21e49c
Record created2012-07-18
Record modified2016-05-09
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