Acid extraction for the determination of methyl mercury in biotissues by isotope dilution gas chromatography inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1039/c3ay40909k
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TypeArticle
Journal titleAnalytical Methods
ISSN1759-9660
Volume5
Issue24
Pages71277131; # of pages: 5
AbstractMethyl mercury (MeHg) is a common contaminant worldwide. Health authorities keep monitoring MeHg levels in biological and environmental samples to assess the corresponding exposure in the population. So far, a basic leaching has been mostly used for the MeHg extraction. In this study, it was demonstrated that methanesulfonic acid, commonly used for amino acid extraction, can be used for MeHg extraction. Species-specific isotope dilution was employed to achieve accurate results. The method was validated by analysis of dogfish liver certified reference material (DOLT-4). The derivatized extracts were then analyzed with gas chromatography-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (GC-ICP-MS). Results obtained for MeHg in DOLT-4 are in agreement with the certified value (t-test, P = 0.05), confirming that methanesulfonic acid extraction is suitable for extraction of MeHg in biological tissues. This new procedure could be of particular interest in biological and toxicological studies where a simultaneous determination of MeHg and certain amino acids is sometimes required.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationMeasurement Science and Standards; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21270355
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Record identifierf92ef430-1aef-44ac-9dfa-edb1e654fe29
Record created2014-02-04
Record modified2016-05-09
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