Atomistic tight-binding theory of multiexciton complexes in a self-assembled InAs quantum dot

Download
  1. (PDF, 803 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: Atomistic tight-binding theory of multiexciton complexes in a self-assembled InAs quantum dot (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1103/PhysRevB.81.085301
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titlePhysical review. B, Condensed matter and materials physics
Volume81
Issue085301
Pages085301-1085301-12; # of pages: 12
AbstractWe present atomistic tight-binding theory of electronic structure and optical properties of InAs/GaAs selfassembled quantum dots. The tight-binding model includes zincblende symmetry, faceting, and sp3d5s* atomic orbitals accounting for interband and intervalley couplings. The equilibrium positions of atoms are calculated using valence force field method and modification of the tight-binding Hamiltonian due to strain is accounted for using Harrison’s law. The electronic and optical properties of multiexciton complexes are then determined by diagonalizing the many-body Hamiltonian for interacting electrons and holes using the configurationinteraction approach. The calculations of strain distribution approach 108 atoms while the electron and valence hole single-particle states are calculated by diagonalization of the Hamiltonian matrix with size on the order of 107. The dependence of predicted electronic and optical properties on InAs/GaAs valence-band offset and InAs absolute valence-band deformation potentials are described. The reliability of the atomistic calculations is assessed by comparison with results obtained from the effective bond orbital model and empirical pseudopotentials method.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Microstructural Sciences; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number17521912
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierf97518d6-a270-4e62-96d0-93c151dba910
Record created2011-03-29
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)