The mechanical properties of saline-doped and carbamide (urea)-doped model ice

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/0165-232X(80)90006-3
AuthorSearch for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleCold Regions Science and Technology
Volume3
Issue1
Pages4556; # of pages: 12
AbstractIn a recent paper by the author (POAC 79 Proceedings, Vol. I, pp. 719-739), it was reported that the use of an alternative dopant to sodium chloride in refrigerated modelling basins would significantly improve the important strain modulus (E) to flexural strength ([delta]f) ratio to well above the minimum acceptable value of 2000. In particular, wet-seeded ice grown from solutions containing 1.3% carbamide (urea) gave E/[delta]f ratios of [approximate]2400 for flexural strengths to less than 20 kPa. It is known from the modelling laws, however, that in addition to the flexural strength and strain modulus, the other physical properties of the ice should be scaled to meet the specific modelling criteria. As such, an experimental investigation into the structure, strain modulus, flexural, shear, compressive and tensile strengths, static frictional coefficients and density of both saline-doped and carbamide (urea)-doped model ice has been carried out to determine their values for model ice. By choosing representative prototype values of these properties for sea ice, the appropriateness of both of these types of model ice as scale representations of sea ice is analyzed.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Centre for Surface Transportation Technology
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number12327273
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Record identifierf9dc885d-2a01-4f01-ac4e-ec57182b8e26
Record created2009-09-10
Record modified2016-05-09
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