Separation of startch and gluten: IV. Application of a rapid process to flours from various grades and types of wheat.

Download
  1. Get@NRC: Separation of startch and gluten: IV. Application of a rapid process to flours from various grades and types of wheat. (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1139/cjr46f-016
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleCanadian Journal of Research
ISSN0366-6581
Volume24f
Issue2
Pages136139; # of pages: 4
AbstractA rapid process for separating starch and gluten from hard wheat patent flour (consisting of dispersal of a soft dough in water followed by screening) has been applied to pastry flour, whole wheat flour, and patent flours from the following wheats: No. 1 Northern, Hard Red Spring of high protein content; No. 2 Northern, Hard Red Spring of low protein content; No. 4 Northern, Hard Red Spring, severely damaged by frost; No. 2 C. W. Garnet; No.: C. W. Amber Durum; and No. 1 Alberta Red Winter. The original separation procedure required only minor modifications in spite of varying quantities and characteristics of the glutens of these flours. Whole wheat flour required a substantially greater amount of mixing water for the preparation of a satisfactory dough. Approximately 90% of the starch present in each flour was recovered. Starches from the patent flours had protein contents ranging from 0.49 to 0.64% while that from whole wheat flour contained 1.06% of protein. Recoveries of gluten from all flours were practically complete. Crude dry gluten prepared from patent flours contained 20 to 30% of starch while the bran–gluten fraction from whole wheat flour contained 9.9%.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21274479
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierfa99854c-7215-4a0c-87f4-2e23c42e5d3d
Record created2015-03-16
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)