Frailty and survival of older Chinese adults in urban and rural areas: Results from the Beijing Longitudinal Study of Aging

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.archger.2011.04.020
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TypeArticle
Journal titleArchives of Gerontology and Geriatrics
ISSN0167-4943
Volume54
Issue1
Pages38; # of pages: 6
SubjectAging; Frailty index; Geographic areas; Rural; Urban; China; Frailty
AbstractDifferences in frailty between rural and urban older adults have been demonstrated in developed countries. It is not understood how the apparently greater differences in living conditions between different types of regions in China may affect health and outcomes of older Chinese adults. Here, a frailty index (FI) based on the accumulation of health deficits was used to investigate health and survival differences in older Chinese men and women. We studied rural (n = 1121) and urban (n = 2136) older adults (55–97 years old) in the Beijing Longitudinal Study of Aging (BLSA), of whom 48.9% (rural) and 35.4% (urban) died over 8 years of follow-up. The FI was generated from 35 self-reported health deficits. The mean FI increased exponentially with age (r² = 0.87) and was higher in women than in men. The death rate increased significantly with increases in the FI, but women showed a lower death rate than did men. The mean FI in urban older adults (0.12 ± 0.10) was lower than that in their rural counterparts (0.14 ± 0.12, p < 0.001). Urban dwellers showed better survival compared with their counterparts in the rural areas. Adjusted by age, sex, and education level, the hazard ratio for death for each increment of the FI was 1.28 for urban people and 1.27 for rural people. Chinese urban dwellers showed better health and survival than rural dwelling older adults. The FI readily summarized health and mortality differences among different geographic regions, reflecting the impact of the environment, socioeconomics, and medical services on deficit accumulation and on survival.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Biodiagnostics; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierS016749431100104X
NPARC number21268667
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Record identifierfb536632-7edf-4199-af83-38f95ce4dddb
Record created2013-11-06
Record modified2016-05-09
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