Pressure drop characteristics of typical stairshafts in high-rise buildings

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TypeArticle
Journal titleASHRAE Transactions
ISSN0001-2505
Volume94
Issue1
Pages12231237; # of pages: 15
Subjectair flow; stairs; high rise buildings; mechanical ventilation; tall buildings; smoke control system design; airflow resistance; pressurization technique; effect of people; modelling; various stair configurations; Indoor air; ecoulement de l'air; escalier; construction elévée; ventilation mécanique
AbstractLittle information exists on the pressure drop characteristics of stairshafts in tall buildings. Full- scale tests were conducted, therefore, to develop data on the airflow resistance required for designing a smoke control system for stairshafts by the pressurization technique. Data were obtained for open and closed tread stairshafts, with and without people inside them. The study revealed that the flow resistance inside the stairshaft with people can be double that without people. Also, a simple physical model to simulate the effect of people on the flow resistance was developed. This paper describes the analytical model, the experimental study, and the data obtained on the airflow resistance for the various stair configurations.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
NotePresented at the ASHRAE Winter Meeting, Dallas, TX, USA, Jan 31-Feb 3, 1988
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIRC-P-1599
NRC number30424
3975
NPARC number20375319
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Record identifierfb893719-029b-4564-9b97-0c085bedbe24
Record created2012-07-23
Record modified2016-05-09
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