Experimental and numerical study of smoke conditions in an atrium with mechanical exhaust

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TypeArticle
Journal titleInternational Journal on Engineering Performance-Based Fire Codes
Volume1
Issue3
Pages183187; # of pages: 5
SubjectAtriums
AbstractFullwscale experiments and numerical modelling using Computational Fluid Dynamics techniques were employed to investigate atrium smoke exhaust in physical model studies. These investigations are part of a joint research project between the American Society of Heating Refrigerating and Air-Conditioning Engineers Inc. (ASHRAE) and the National Research Council of Canada (NRCC). The objective of these studies is to develop input to design guides for atrium smoke management systems. This paper presents initial results from this study. The physical tests were done in a specifically constructed compartment equipped with a smoke exhaust system and instrumentation for measuring temperatures, CO2 concentrations and velocities. Fire was modelled using propane burners capable of producing fires with different intensities and areas. The numerical simulations were done using Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) models. A comparison between the experimental and predicted temperatures and CO2 concentrations indicated that the CFD model can predict the conditions in the room. as well as the depth of the hot layer.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
NotePreviously published in Proceedings of the First International Symposium on Engineering Performance-Based Fire Codes, Hong Kong, pp. 179-185.
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number42474
8894
NPARC number20331539
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Record identifierfc9b6dec-8acd-4349-83b2-2db4e03ec3f2
Record created2012-07-18
Record modified2016-05-09
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