Protection of foam plastic thermal insulation in low sloped roofing systems

Download
  1. (PDF, 765 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: Protection of foam plastic thermal insulation in low sloped roofing systems (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/0075424202025004600
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Thermal Envelope & Building Science
Volume25
Issue4
Pages255274; # of pages: 20
Subjectroofing, foam, plastic, air barrier, vapour barrier, blistering, thermal insulation; Cellular plastics (plastic foam); Air and vapour barriers; Moisture performance
AbstractFoam plastic thermal insulations have substantially replaced traditional insulations in low sloped roofing systems in North America. Foam plastic thermal insulations used in low sloped roofs are low density (typically 16 to 48 kg/m 3 ) materials with low permeability to air and water vapour. In many roofs these materials have been directly substituted for traditional (wood and glass fibre) insulations without due attention to the different material characteristics. Moist air movement within roofs, condensation protection (air and vapour barriers), steel deck corrosion, roof membrane blistering and roof traffic damage are discussed. This paper discusses protection of foam plastic thermal insulations in roofing systems, why the protection is needed, and what consequences result if these materials are not protected. Case studies demonstrate the importance of condensation protection in reducing corrosion of galvanized steel in roofs containing closed cell phenolic foam roof insulation in Canada.
Publication date
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number45712
14992
NPARC number20386475
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierfcd251c8-efdc-4111-88a9-310a5ea1614a
Record created2012-07-25
Record modified2016-05-09
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)