Naturally acquired antibodies against Haemophilus influenzae type a in aboriginal adults, Canada

Download
  1. (PDF, 707 KB)
  2. Get@NRC: Naturally acquired antibodies against Haemophilus influenzae type a in aboriginal adults, Canada (Opens in a new window)
DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.3201/eid2102.140722
AuthorSearch for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for: ; Search for:
TypeArticle
Journal titleEmerging Infectious Diseases
ISSN1080-6040
1080-6059
Volume21
Issue2
Pages273279
AbstractIn the post-Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib) vaccine era that began in the 1980's, H. influenzae type a (Hia) emerged as a prominent cause of invasive disease in North American Aboriginal populations. To test whether a lack of naturally acquired antibodies may underlie increased rates of invasive Hia disease, we compared serum bactericidal activity against Hia and Hib and IgG and IgM against capsular polysaccharide between Canadian Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal healthy and immunocompromised adults. Both healthy and immunocompromised Aboriginal adults exhibited significantly higher bactericidal antibody titers against Hia than did non-Aboriginal adults (p = 0.042 and 0.045 respectively), with no difference in functional antibody activity against Hib. IgM concentrations against Hia were higher than IgG in most study groups; the inverse was true for antibody concentrations against Hib. Our results indicate that Aboriginal adults possess substantial serum bactericidal activity against Hia that is mostly due to IgM antibodies. The presence of sustained IgM against Hia suggests recent Hia exposure.
Publication date
PublisherCenters for Disease Control and Prevention
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationHuman Health Therapeutics; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23001567
Export citationExport as RIS
Report a correctionReport a correction
Record identifierfe370596-20ec-4c5c-84b2-e796d749370b
Record created2017-03-07
Record modified2017-03-07
Bookmark and share
  • Share this page with Facebook (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Twitter (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Google+ (Opens in a new window)
  • Share this page with Delicious (Opens in a new window)