Trichostatin A increases embryo and green plant regeneration in wheat

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1007/s00299-017-2183-3
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TypeArticle
Journal titlePlant Cell Reports
ISSN0721-7714
1432-203X
Volume36
Issue11
Pages17011706
Subjecttrichostatin A; wheat microspore culture; embryogenesis; doubled-haploidy; plant regeneration
AbstractIn wheat, plant regeneration through microspore culture is an integral part of doubled haploid (DH) production. However, low response to tissue culture and genotype specificity are two major constraints in the broad deployment of this breeding tool. Recently, the structure of chromatin was shown to be linked with cell transitions during tissue culture. Specifically, repression of genes that are required for cell morphogenesis, through acetylation of histones, may play an important role in this process. Reduction of histone acetylation by chemical inhibition may increase tissue culture efficiency. Here, the role of trichostatin A (TSA) in inducing microspore-derived embryos was investigated in wheat. The optimal dose of TSA was determined for wheat cultivars and subsequently validated in F1 hybrids. A significant increase in the efficiency of DH production was observed in both cultivated varieties and F1 hybrids. Thus, the inclusion of TSA in DH protocols for wheat breeding programs is advocated.
Publication date
PublisherSpringer
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationAquatic and Crop Resource Development; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23002427
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Record identifier2abe3cdb-507b-498d-adbd-a3bb46445def
Record created2017-11-08
Record modified2017-11-08
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