Synthesis and characterization of a new structure of gas hydrate

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.0809342106
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TypeArticle
Journal titleProceedings of the National Academy of Science of the United States of america
Volume106
Issue15
Pages60606064; # of pages: 5
Subjecthigh pressure; ice; clathrate hydrate
AbstractAtoms and molecules <0.9 nm in diameter can be incorporated in the cages formed by hydrogen-bonded water molecules making up the crystalline solid clathrate hydrates. For these materials crystallographic structures generally fall into 3 categories, which are 2 cubic forms and a hexagonal form. A unique clathrate hydrate structure, previously known only hypothetically, has been synthesized at high pressure and recovered at 77 K and ambient pressure in these experiments. These samples contain Xe as a guest atom and the details of this previously unobserved structure are described here, most notably the host-guest ratio is similar to the cubic Xe clathrate starting material. After pressure quench recovery to 1 atmosphere the structure shows considerable metastability with increasing temperature (T <160 K) before reverting back to the cubic form. This evidence of structural complexity in compositionally similar clathrate compounds indicates that the reaction path may be an important determinant of the structure, and impacts upon the structures that might be encountered in nature.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada; NRC Steacie Institute for Molecular Sciences
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number16435911
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Record identifier461d38d1-3b1a-42b3-9fc5-ea47bbd7074f
Record created2011-02-14
Record modified2016-05-09
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