Thermal response of basement wall systems with low emissivity material and furred airspace

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1177/1744259111411652
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Building Physics
Volume35
Issue2
Pages122; # of pages: 22
Subjectbasement wall, above-grade, below-grade, furred-airspace assembly, low emissivity material, thermal modelling, thermal resistance, R-value, heat transfer by natural convection and radiation; Walls
AbstractIn basement wall systems, airspaces can contribute in obtaining a higher thermal resistance, if a low-emissivity material such as reflective foil is installed within a furred-airspace. In this study, numerical simulations were conducted using the hygrothermal model ?hygIRC-C? that was developed at the National Research Council of Canada?s Institute for Research in Construction to investigate the steady-state and transient thermal performance of basement wall systems. This model solves simultaneously the energy equation in the various material layers, surface-to-surface radiation equation in the furred-airspace assembly, Navier?Stokes equation for the airspace, and Darcy and Brinkman equations for the porous material layers. The wall systems used in the simulations incorporate a low-emissivity material (foil with emissivity = 0.04) bonded to a moulded/expanded polystyrene foam that is installed in a furred-airspace assembly. The furring is installed horizontally and covered with a gypsum board. The structural element of the wall (external layer) is a poured-in-place concrete. Walls with and without furred-airspace assembly were considered in this study. Also, consideration was given to investigate the effect of the above-grade and below-grade portions of the wall on the thermal performance when these walls are subjected to two different Canadian climates. Results showed that at steady-state condition, the effective thermal resistance (R-value) of the wall with a furred-airspace assembly depends on the soil, outdoor, and indoor temperatures. Additionally, these wall configurations resulted in an energy savings of ~17% compared to walls without furred-airspace assembly when these walls are subjected to two different climate conditions.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number53962
21435
NPARC number20386582
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Record identifier7f55d2bf-21c7-433c-a3a1-835d25f94995
Record created2012-07-25
Record modified2016-05-09
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