An engineered TGF-β monomer that functions as a dominant negative to block TGF-β signaling

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  1. Available on February 22, 2018
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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M116.768754
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Biological Chemistry
ISSN0021-9258
1083-351X
Pages# of pages: 40
AbstractThe transforming growth factor beta isoforms, TGF-β1, -β2, and -β3 are small secreted homodimeric signaling proteins with essential roles in regulating the adaptive immune system and maintaining the extracellular matrix. However, dysregulation of the TGF-β pathway is responsible for promoting the progression of several human diseases, including cancer and fibrosis. In spite of the known importance of TGF-βs in promoting disease progression, no inhibitors have been approved for use in humans. Herein, we describe an engineered TGF-β monomer, lacking the heel helix, a structural motif essential for binding the TGF-β type I receptor, TβRI, but dispensible for binding the other receptor required for TGF-β signaling, the TGF-β type II receptor, TβRII, as an alternative therapeutic modality for blocking TGF-β signaling in humans. As shown through binding studies and crystallography, the engineered monomer retained the same overall structure of native TGF-β monomers and bound TβRII in an identical manner. Cell-based luciferase assays showed that the engineered monomer functioned as a dominant negative to inhibit TGF-β signaling with a Ki of 20 - 70 nM. Investigation of the mechanism showed that the high affinity of the engineered monomer for TβRII, coupled with its reduced ability to non-covalently dimerize and its inability to bind and recruit TβRI, enabled it to bind endogenous TβRII, but prevented it from binding and recruiting TβRI to form a signaling complex. Such engineered monomers provide a new avenue to probe and manipulate TGF-β signaling, and may inform similar modifications of other TGF-β family members.
Publication date
PublisherAmerican Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationHuman Health Therapeutics; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23002201
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Record identifier7fa45627-206c-465e-8616-06acc30fe7e8
Record created2017-09-05
Record modified2017-09-05
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