Contrapropagating Ultrasonic Flowmeter Using Clad Buffer Rods for High Temperature measurement

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1115/1.4002717
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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Dynamic Systems, Measurement, and Control
Volume133
Issue1
Pages011007011013; # of pages: 7
Subjecthigh temperature ultrasonic measurement; contrapropagating flowmeter; clad buffer rods; water flow speed; oil flow speed
AbstractThis work proposes clad buffer rods driven by shear transducers as the main building block of contrapropagating ultrasonic flowmeters for high temperature application. It is demonstrated that the superior signal-to-noise ratio exhibited by clad buffer rods (compared with the reported nonclad counterparts) improves precision in transit time measurements, leading to more accurate flow speed determination. In addition, it is shown that clad buffer rods generate specific ultrasonic signals for temperature calibration of flowmeters, allowing temperature variation while still measuring accurately the flow speed. On the basis of these experimental results, a contrapropagating ultrasonic flowmeter was designed and installed in a heater machine for flow speed measurements of hot oil at temperatures near 130°C. For a temperature variation of 3°C, the difference between upstream and downstream ultrasonic transit times, which is proportional to the flow speed at a given temperature, was measured within 1 ns accuracy.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Industrial Materials Institute; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NRC number47903
NPARC number18335869
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Record identifierb1fac29a-fcb1-4bef-a1e7-7f3bcff9b776
Record created2011-07-27
Record modified2017-03-23
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