An analytical approach to relate shot peening parameters to Almen intensity

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.surfcoat.2010.08.105
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TypeArticle
Journal titleSurface and Coatings Technology
ISSN02578972
Volume205
Issue7
Pages20552066
SubjectShot peening; Almen intensity; Analytical model; Induced stress; Residual stress
AbstractShot peening is widely used in the automotive and aerospace industries to improve the fatigue strength of metal components by introducing near-surface plastic strains and compressive residual stresses. This mechanical treatment is primarily controlled by monitoring Almen (peening) intensity, which corresponds to the arc height at saturation of standardized test strips exposed to the shot stream. However, the same Almen intensity may be obtained by using small shots impacting the surface at high velocity or by using large shots impacting the surface at low velocity. This paper describes a model for predicting Almen intensity based on an analytical model for shot peening residual stresses. Theoretical results for different sets of peening parameters were consistent with published experimental results and revealed that although different combinations of shot peening parameters can produce the same Almen intensity, each combination resulted in a different through thickness residual stress distribution.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Aerospace Research; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierS0257897210007620
NPARC number23002564
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Record identifierb3600d9a-c1e6-4a80-8942-1545e7af1b9b
Record created2017-11-30
Record modified2017-11-30
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