Crack detection using induction thermography for thermomechanical fatigue tests

DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1063/1.3592137
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TypeArticle
Proceedings titleREVIEW OF PROGRESS IN QUANTITATIVE NONDESTRUCTIVE EVALUATION: Volume 30A; Volume 30B
Series titleAIP Conference Proceedings; no. 1335
Conference37th Annual Review of Progress in Quantitative Nondestructive Evaluation, QNDE, 18 July 2010 through 23 July 2010, San Diego, CA
ISBN9780735408883
Pages17271734; # of pages: 8
AbstractEarly fatigue crack growth behavior is an important aspect to the total fatigue life for many engineering applications. During a thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) test, crack inspections are commonly done in a disruptive manner using an acetate replication method; and post-test crack evaluations are done using both optical and scanning electronic microscope methods. This paper investigates a proof-of-concept technique for using induction thermography as a new in-situ, non-destructive inspection approach for use during TMF testing. The results obtained by induction thermography are compared to those obtained via the traditional acetate replication method and post-test scanning electron microscope (SEM) evaluation. The induction thermography inspections were carried out at several temperatures and show that the temperature used for the TMF test does not influence the crack detection capability. It is demonstrated that induction thermography can detect cracks smaller than 500 μm and has potential for quantifying the crack length. © 2011 American Institute of Physics.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNational Research Council Canada (NRC-CNRC); Aerospace (AERO-AERO)
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number21271281
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Record identifierba6c5ee7-06e3-42f7-a28e-f8a65144bd2d
Record created2014-03-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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