Measured soil thermal conductivities and modified design curves for predicting frost penetration adjacent to insulated foundations

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TypeArticle
Journal titleJournal of Thermal Insulation
ISSN0148-8287
Volume10
Pages270285; # of pages: 16
Subjectthermal insulation; frost penetration depth; thermal conductivity; soils; basements; frost; frost depth; soil; soil conductivity; foundation insulation; design curve; Basements and foundations; isolation thermique; profondeur de penétration du gel; conductivité thermique; sol (terre); sous sol (bâtiments)
AbstractMethods for predicting frost penetrations are necessary when foundations are placed on frost susceptible soils if problems with frost heave are to be avoided. Graphical methods exist for predicting frost penetration for unheated foundations, however, design information for heated foundations is very limited. Insulation levels on heated foundations will affect the heat loss to the surrounding soil and hence the depth of frost penetration. The paper presents long term measured frost penetration and soil conductivity data for four typical heated residential foundations. Graphical relationships (modified design curves) between frost depths and freezing indices are presented and compared with open field (unheated) conditions.
Publication date
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationNRC Institute for Research in Construction; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
IdentifierIRC-P-1545
NRC number29118
1263
NPARC number20378815
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Record identifierca738841-1af8-4d95-8719-2a4d50ba3d67
Record created2012-07-24
Record modified2016-05-09
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