Isochoric, isobaric and ultrafast conductivities of aluminum, lithium and carbon in the warm dense matter (WDM) regime

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TypeArticle
Journal titleCondensed Matter
Article numberarXiv:1710.04191
Pages# of pages: 15
AbstractWe study the conductivities σ of (i) the equilibrium isochoric state (σ is ), (ii) the equilibrium isobaric state (σ ib ), and also the (iii) non-equilibrium ultrafast matter (UFM) state (σ uf ) with the ion temperature T i less than the the electron temperature T e . Aluminum, lithium and carbon are considered, being increasingly complex warm dense matter (WDM) systems, with carbon having transient covalent bonds. First-principles calculations, i.e., neutral-pseudoatom (NPA) calculations and density-functional theory (DFT) with molecular-dynamics (MD) simulations, are compared where possible with experimental data to characterize σ ic ,σ ib and σ uf . The NPA σ ib are closest to the available experimental data when compared to results from DFT+MD, where simulations of about 64-125 atoms are typically used. The published conductivities for Li are reviewed and the value at a temperature of 4.5 eV is examined using supporting X-ray Thomson scattering calculations. A physical picture of the variations of σ with temperature and density applicable to these materials is given. The insensitivity of σ to T e below 10 eV for carbon, compared to Al and Li, is clarified.
Publication date
PublisherCornell University Library
Linkhttps://arxiv.org/abs/1710.04191
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationSecurity and Disruptive Technologies; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedNo
NPARC number23002469
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Record identifierdc58373b-7f7c-41f0-a4d2-5d157412b40d
Record created2017-11-15
Record modified2017-11-15
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