Ethanol-to-methane activity of Geobacter-deprived anaerobic granules enhanced by conductive microparticles

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DOIResolve DOI: http://doi.org/10.1016/j.procbio.2017.07.032
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TypeArticle
Journal titleProcess Biochemistry
ISSN1359-5113
Volume63
Pages4248
Subjectinterspecies electron transfer; DIET; anaerobic granular sludge; ethanol; methane-producing activity; substrate-consuming activity
AbstractDirect interspecies electron transfer (DIET) has been typically proposed as mechanism of electron transfer among methanogenic populations in granules during anaerobic digestion where Geobacter species play a key role. Using anaerobic granules where Geobacteraceae members were not prevalent − representing only 0.3% of total bacteria −, tests incubated with two co-substrates showed that the rate of methanogenesis from formate and hydrogen diminished in the presence of a non-methanogenic co-substrate such as ethanol. This could indicate that biological DIET occurs and competes with hydrogen and formate during methanogenesis. Moreover, the addition of conductive microparticles, such as stainless steel and granular activated carbon, was found to increase methanogenic activity in disintegrated granules by 190 ± 18% and 175 ± 22% respectively as compared to disintegrated granules devoid of microparticles. The addition of non-conductive microparticles such as porcelain however decreased methanogenic activity by 65 ± 3% of the disrupted granules without microparticle activity. These results indicate that syntrophic bacteria from anaerobic sludge excluding Geobacter species can also carry out conductive mineral mediated DIET.
Publication date
PublisherElsevier
LanguageEnglish
AffiliationEnergy, Mining and Environment; National Research Council Canada
Peer reviewedYes
NPARC number23002549
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Record identifiere5cf719b-1001-4261-b7fe-739e4fcb0e33
Record created2017-11-29
Record modified2017-11-29
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